History

Reverend Henry Jee, a local pastor, founded the Asian American Resource Center and oversaw its incorporations as a tax-exempt 501(C)(3) organization in 1997. His concern and compassion for Asians immigrating to the Atlanta area inspired him to commit his life savings to the organization prior to his death in 2002. His wife, Connie Jee, now leads the Center as its Executive Director. We continue to expand our services to meet the increasing demand posed by the explosive growth of immigrant populations in the metro Atlanta area.

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1997

    The Asian American Resource Foundation is established

  • Rev. Henry Jee opens the AARF office in Lilburn
  • Begins offering social services and counseling
  • Becomes Atlanta Minority Economic Development committee member
  • Becomes State of Georgia Advisory Committee Member
1998
  • Begins collaboration with Atlanta Food Bank
  • ESL and Civics classes begin
  • Receives special fund from Georgia Governor Zell Miller
  • UPS Foundation provides grant for education program
1999
  • Receives Susan G. Komen breast cancer education grant
  • Listed in Gwinnett county data base as a First Call for help organization
  • Christian World Service collaboration begins
  • Hands on Atlanta collaboration for volunteer program established
  • Becomes Gwinnett County Human Relations Commission member
  • Oriental Art brush class begins
  • Offers free mammogram screenings for low-income Korean-American women
2000
  • Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Service Award recipient
  • Free school supplies distributed to low-income families with WalMart
2001
  • Gov. Roy Barnes provides special emergency fund
  • Channel 17, WTBS, social service award recipient
  • Soprano Kim Shin Ja fundraising concert for educational scholarships
  • Evergreen college for elderly education program begins
2002
  • Rev. Henry Jee passes away
2003
  • Moved to new location at the Norcross Human Services Center at 5030 Georgia Belle Court in Norcross
  • Collaborates with Gwinnett County Department of Labor for job placement service
  • Free tax preparation assistance offered
2004
  • Asian American Resource Foundation renamed as the Asian American Resource Center
  • Collaborates with the Norcross Human Services Center to begin computer classes
  • The Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta Grant awarded
  • The late Rev. Henry Jee receives W.C.C. Peace Award
  • HUD grant received from federal government leading to establishment of Transitional Housing program
  • Adult literacy program established from funds received by State of Georgia Adult Literacy grant
  • Overcoat Project established (free overcoats for low-income families)
  • Nordson Grant awarded
2005
  • Rental/Utility assistance program established from funds provided by Gwinnett County’s Emergency Shelter Grant
  • Emergency Food and Shelter Program started
  • Wachovia Bank and Sam’s/WalMart grant awarded
  • Inaugural Rice Festival helod
  • Korean Presidential Award for Community Service and Education received
  • Over 23,746 people served
2006
  • Bank of America grant received
  • John Wieland grant received
  • Intercontinental Bank grant received
  • 11Alive Excellence in Education Award received
  • Who’s Who in the Asian American Community Social Service Award recipient
  • 2nd annual Rice Festival held
2007
  • North Korean refuge program established
2008
  • Hearts for One Project established. Program provides cash support to those in the community who do not qualify for mainstream benefits. Each year, a new area of focus is set.
  • Earn Benefit Program begins. This program screens clients to see if they are eligible to receive mainstream benefits. Translation services are available as well as assistance for filling out applications.
2009
  • AARC acquires funds to add one additional unit to the Transitional Housing program.
2010
  • Counselor Training Program established. This program provides information for those interested in how to be more empathetic and to recognize the symptoms of some of the most common problems facing society today: depression, drug abuse, teen suicide.
  • Received funding to start a revamped vocational education program. The Vocational Education Program is currently being reorganized. The new program will include GED instruction, job placement assistance, and vocational training.
  • Free Legal Counseling program established. This free program provides free legal advice to low-income individuals in need.
  • Free Housing Counseling program established. This free program provides counseling for those who face foreclosure and are otherwise facing difficulty with their mortgages.
2011
  • AARC acquires funds to add one additional unit to the Transitional Housing program.
2012
  • 25 Most Influential Asian Americans in Georgia Award received– Georgia Asian Times
2013
  • Moved to new location in Duluth
2016
  • Changed from the transitional housing program to a Rapid Re-housing program
2017
  • Received ACADA award, FY awards, Community Champion Award